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Mighty Valley

Rebel Yell

Regular price
$18.00
Regular price
Sale price
$18.00
Grind
Origin Guatemala
Process Washed
Varietal Yellow Catuai, Panche San Ramón 
Aroma Caramel, Red Fruit
Roast Full City
Body Supple  

Flavour

Rebel Yell has crisp acidity and lingering sweetness wrapped in round smooth body. The caramel notes come out in the aftertaste along with a delicate aromas of raspberry and strawberry.

Origin

These single producer beans come to us directly from the 3 hectare farm of Romeo Jimenez in Caserìo Cañalitos, Casillas, Santa Rosa, Guatemala. We work with Semilla Coffee who imports this bean directly from the producer group around Mataqueseuintla, Guatemala - locally known as Cafe Colis Resistencia, who Semilla’s founder Brendan Adams notes, “face perhaps the most adversity of any of the three groups Semilla works with.”

We call this bean “Rebel Yell” because of its roots in the local Cafe Colis Resistencia group, led by coffee producing members of the Indigenous XInka community around Mataquescuintla who are both fighting the Excobal silver mine (owned and operated by the Canadian-based Pan-American Silver and built without the consolation nor the consent of local people), and are developing an international market for their coffee, and therefore, for finally receiving fair prices for their work.

Within Mataquescuintla and area, nearly 90% of the population identifies as a coffee producer and yet, almost none of these producers have access to a market beyond selling in cherry to local intermediaries or to large farms who process their coffee and sell it as blended lots to their international market. This has major impacts on the price of coffees for small producers who have little to no option and simply sell to whoever they can, and accept whatever price is offered. In good times, this price is 115 - 130 Quetzal for 100 pounds of ripe cherry — approximately $15-17USD for 100 pounds or $.15/pound — but this was reported to drop as low as 60-80 Quetzal this year, which barely covers the cost paid to pickers.
To make matters worse, Guatemala offers little to no support to farmers like those in Mataquescuintla. Guatemala’s history of coffee production has endured via a system of production and export in which the government supports major landholders of European or Mestizo descent while holding back resources and access to small-scale Indigenous producers such as those in Mataquescuintla.
Semilla’s work with Cafe Colis Resistencia therefore aims to to primarily assist them in the development of an international market in Canada and the United States. We are proud and happy to support this group’s resistance efforts by directly buying their beans via Semilla.